The Qualities Of A Astronaut Suit


astronaut suit

In order to be an astronaut, you need an astronaut suit that can protect you from the harsh environment of space. The suit must be able to keep you cool in the extreme heat and keep you warm in the extreme cold. It must also be able to protect you from radiation and micro-meteoroids.

It must be able to keep you cool in extreme heat

A person wearing a hat

In space, the Sun’s rays are fierce and there is no air to stop them from hitting your body. In addition to this, you will also feel hotter because there is no air pressure inside the suit meaning that sweat cannot evaporate from your skin. The astronaut suit has cooling systems which use water piped through tiny holes in the fabric of the suit. This water makes its way around tiny veins in the fabric that carry it close to your body. A thin membrane on top of these tiny veins prevents the water from seeping into your body whilst still allowing enough of it to pass through for it to take away most of your own body heat. Using this system an astronaut can stay cool in temperatures up to 250 degrees Celsius or more.

It must be able to keep you warm in extreme cold

In space, there is no atmosphere and this means that although the Sun’s rays cannot harm you, the Earth’s radiant heat does not reach you either. An astronaut on a spacewalk can feel colder than he would do on Earth because of the lack of atmosphere. The astronaut suit has insulation designed to retain your own body heat but it also has another system that uses water piped through tiny holes in the fabric again which makes its way around tiny veins close to your body. A thin membrane on top of these tiny veins prevents the water from seeping into your body whilst still allowing enough of it to pass through for it to take away most of your own body heat. Using this system an astronaut can stay warm in temperatures down to -110 degrees Celsius or less.

It must be able to protect you from radiation and micro-meteoroids

Radiation poses the greatest threat to astronauts because they are not protected by Earth’s atmosphere or by its magnetic field so they have no protection against harmful, sinister particles streaming towards them from the Sun. The tiny particles of dust called ‘micro meteors’ pose a lesser danger but are still dangerous if their speed is high enough. The spacesuit has specially designed fabrics that are capable of absorbing both types of threat by stopping radiation penetrating into the suit which would harm the skin underneath, and stopping micrometeoroid particles penetrating into the suit which would damage skin underneath.

It must be able to provide you with breathable air

Astronauts do not bring oxygen tanks because they would be too heavy to take all the way up into space so instead, their suit has its own system which controls the flow of oxygen in and out of it according to need. The astronaut suit is not pressurized like a plane cabin is but still allows astronauts to breathe naturally without an extra source of oxygen. This is achieved using gas-recycling systems that extract carbon dioxide from exhaled air then use filters made from lithium hydroxide cartridges that are similar to those used by scuba divers. Carbon dioxide is removed by passing through chemicals called zeolites before being passed into storage tanks. Oxygen is then added and the recycled gas becomes breathable again. An astronaut can survive for between 7 and 8 hours without oxygen because of this system which means that long journeys such as on spacewalks or trips to Mars will be made possible.

Conclusion

To create an astronaut suit that is able to withstand the rigors of space travel, it must be made with strong materials. It has to stand up against the heat and pressure of outer space while protecting astronauts from radiation and other hazards. The material should also provide insulation for warmth in both hot and cold temperatures. Additionally, suits need an air supply system so they can breathe without having to wear their helmet at all times; otherwise, carbon dioxide will accumulate quickly because there’s no place for it to escape into or out of. Finally, because astronauts are human beings too (and not just machines), they want comfort as well as protection!

Subscribe to our monthly Newsletter
Subscribe to our monthly Newsletter